October 2011

Front Row (left to right): Christina Lord, Gaolathe Rantong, Lydia Fraughton and Dr.Arunika Gunawardena

Back Row (left to right): Jaime Wertman, Devin MacDonald, Adrian Dauphinee, and Rebecca Watts

 

Harrison Wright

Harrison's Research

 

I took the long road to starting my PhD work in Biology at Dalhousie University (Halifax, NS) in 2008. I began my academic career at Mount Allison University (Sackville, NB) where I studied engineering and received my Engineering Core Certificate. After taking a year off from Academia to work/travel and attend ground school at Scotia Flight Centre (Waterville, NS), where I obtained my radio license and student pilot licence, I proceeded to Acadia University (Wolfville, NS) where I received a BSc in Physics, with a minor in Mathematics, over the next two years. Having been forced kicking and screaming to take a first-year English course as a part of my BSc, I decided I enjoyed the Arts and I attended Acadia for an additional two years at the end of which I received a BA in English. During this same tenure I wrote and published my own personal memoir about growing up in rural Nova Scotia (http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/) and joined the Writers’ Federation of Nova Scotia (WFNS) (http://www.writers.ns.ca/Writers/hwright.html).

At this point my life took yet another turn when I accepted a job at the Kentville Research Centre (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) as the driver of a 1974 3-tonne spray truck with faulty brakes used for the organic apple thinning trials. I worked my way through different jobs gradually graduating to equipment that was less faulty and began to attend Acadia University part-time, this time taking a few core Biology courses. I followed this up by attending Dalhousie/NSAC (Truro, NS) from which I received a MSc in Plant Science for my work on chlorophyll fluorescence in response to osmotic stress in grapes (Vitis spp.). My current PhD work seeks to better understand the Anaerobic Compensation Point (ACP) in plants and has immediate potential applications to the energy-reducing food storage industry. As a special topics course I am also attempting to characterize of organelle behavior and cyclosis in lace plant (Aponogeton madagascariensis) leaves undergoing PCD.

 

Stephanie Lane

Stephanie's Research

 

 

Stephanie is an undergraduate student currently in her fourth year studying Biology at Dalhousie University. After meeting Dr. Arunika Gunawardena in a developmental biology class she started volunteering in her lab and working with the lace plant in January 2010. Stephanie has enjoyed her volunteer work and learning sterile tissue culturing of the lace plant and various laboratory techniques. As of September 2010 she is excited to be in a Special Topics class with Dr. Gunawardena. For her Special Topics class she will be concentrating her attention on the transvacuolar strands and their role in the programmed cell death process in the lace plant. Stephanie is excited to be learning more in depth plant cell process involved with programmed cell death, and hopes her research will assist the understanding of the the unique developmental process of the lace pant.

September 2010

From Left to Right - Back Row: Gaolathe Rantong, Adrian Dauphinee, and Harrison Wright

 

 

Front Row: Stephanie Lane, Jaime Wertman, Dr. Arunika Gunawardena, and Christina Lord

 

 

 

 

 

Past Lab Members

2011

 

.

 

 

 

Home

Lace Plant

PCD Research

Facilities

Publications

Awards

Contact

Videos

 

Lab Members

Arunika

Adrian

Georgia

Meredith

Lab volunteers

 

Experiential Learning

Lab Events & Photos

Art work

Volunteer work

Winninglaceplantimages

 

Past Lab Members

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

 

Conferences

Collaborators

Visitors

Funding

Positions

Teaching

Convocation

Inspirational talks

Links